Getama

Getama began their story as a mattress factory, founded in 1899 by the young joiner Carl Pedersen. The factory was located in a small town in Northern Jutland, called Gedsted, and Carl Pedersen had an idea of using seaweed from the local Limfjord to make mattresses, so he founded Gedsted Tang- og Madrasfabrik (Gedsted Seaweed and Matress Factory). By using seaweed he was able to offer a more comfortable mattress that the more commonly ones using straw or heather. It was a huge success with the range of mattresses grow gradually, and in 1910 the first bed and furniture collection was introduced.

Even though the factory was renowned (in Denmark) for excellent craftsmanship and high quality, the internationally breakthrough came with Hans J Wegner, and in 1953 they change name to Getama.

Around 1950 Wegner cooperated with five Danish funiture makers to produce his designs. In 1951 the cooperation was formalized and the company ‘Salesco’ was an unique sales and marketing company that promoted Wegner’s work both in Denmark and abroad during the 1950s and 1960s. Salesco consisted of Carl Hansen & Søn, who produced chairs, Getama produced furniture pieces with cushions and beds, A.P. Stolen produced the upholstered furniture pieces, Ry-Møbler produced the shelves, carbines and the likes, while Andreas Tuck produced the tables.

With Salesco Wegner ensured that his all of his designs were produced at places where he could oversee and control the production. Salesco also began a comprehensive exhibition and advertisement activity targeted on end-consumers. Salesco played a very important part in capturing the internationally interest in Danish Design.

Getama never solely produced Wegner furniture designs, but also collaborated with other Danish designers, such as Jørgen & Nanna Ditzel.

bo-ex

The Danish furniture manufacturer, bo-ex furniture, is internationally renowned and recognized for their exceptional high quality leather and steel furniture pieces which includes signature pieces like the bo-561 (1963), the Sculpture Chair (1964) and the Cane Chair (1982), all hand-crafted to perfection with incredible attention to detail.

The story begins in 1951, as bo-ex furniture emerges as an export branch of Danish Bovirke furniture (a manufacturer mainly known for producing Finn Juhl designs in the 1950s-60). In the early 1960s bo-ex teamed up with the young and talented design couple, Preben Fabricius and Jørgen Kastholm, who with their love for ultra minimalistic and pure lines found a perfect match in bo-ex. Up through the 1960s bo-ex produced the timeless, elegant and functional Fabricius & Kastholm designs, like the bo-562 (1963), the bo-571 (1962) and the Sculpture Chair (1964).

In 1969 bo-ex included furniture pieces, designed by a new couple of young promising designers, Jørgen Lund and Ole Larsen, who shared the passion for perfection of detail. Their designs include the bo-844 (1978), bo-850 (1978) and the Cane Chair (1982).

bo-ex furniture is taken over by Gert Auhagen and one of his brothers, Jørgen (owner of an upholster primarily subcontracting to Fritz Hansen) in December 1979, and they continues production of the popular furniture pieces. In 1994 Gert assumes sole ownership of bo-ex, and steers bo-ex into the new century. In 2003 bo-ex launches the reproduction of the Scimitar Chair, the Stool, the Daybed and the Sculpture Chair, all by Fabricius & Kastholm.

Laoni Belysning

Laoni Belysning (Lighting) was a small Danish lighting producer, established by Jørgen Larsen and Flemming Nielsen sometime in the 1960s. There is very little information to find about Laoni, but we have been able to find that the company were based in Glostrup on the outskirts of Copenhagen around 1965 and moved to Solrød (close to Glostrup) in 1975. In 1978 Jørgen Larsen left the company and Flemming Nielsen carried on by him self.

Laoni Belysning closes in 1982.

If you have more information about Laoni Belysning, please do feel free to share, as we like to know.

LYFA/Orrefors

The Scandinavian collaboration between Danish lighting producer, LYFA, and the Swedish glassworks, Orrefors, began in the 1950s and carried on well into the 1970s. The chief designer at Orrefors, Carl Fagerlund, designed a wide range of crystal glass shapes, which LYFA could turn into lighting.

The result were several wall lights, pendants and flush-light with the common theme of crystal glass shades combined in various way with a brass structure. The crystal glass was either smooth thin bottle-green crystal glass or thick double corrugated crystal glass in three tones; rich amber, champagne and clear.

Often are these crystal lights marketed under Orrefors Krystalbelysning (Orrefors Crystal Lighting) with Carl Fagerlund mentioned as the designer.

Carl Hansen & Søn

In 1908 master cabinetmaker Carl Hansen opened a furniture workshop in Odense, Denmark and quickly became well-known the high quality of his work. The first real factory opened in 1915, specializing in bespoke furniture for bedroom suites and dining room sets.

The Great Depression affected furniture sales in Denmark hard, including Carl Hansen. In 1934 his second-oldest son and master cabinetmaker, Holger Hansen, took over the business after his father. The company survived these tough times by having a contract with the American sewing machine manufacturer Singer for the production of wooden cases for some of their models. Holger Hansen also set up a small-scale export of furniture to Sweden. At some point the company changed name to Carl Hansen & Søn.

After WW2 Carl Hansen & Søn, engaged sales manager Ejvind Kold Kristensen, and he kept a close eye on the new breed of emerging Danish furniture designers, such as Finn Juhl, Hans J. Wegner and Børge Mogensen. Kold Kristensen was especially impression the young Hans J. Wegner, whose designs won critical acclaim at exhibitions, but not known in the wide population. He knew that Wegner would be a great asset and propel Carl Hansen & Søn into the future. He wanted Wegner to design furniture pieces suited for mass production.

In 1949 Wegner and Carl Hansen & Søn embarked on a joined furniture adventure with Kold Kristensen as lead sales man. The first chair was the iconic CH24 or Wishbone Chair, put into production in 1950 and is to this day the most popular Wegner Chair in the product range. Wegner three other chairs for Carl Hansen & Søn in 1949, all put into production along the CH24.

Dedicating the majority of the furniture production to a rather unknown designer was a huge gamble for Holger Hansen at the time. The four chairs were not immediate successes until a few years later as the interest in Wegner’s designs grew both in Denmark and abroad.

Along working with Carl Hansen & Søn, Wegner designed furniture for four other Danish manufacturers, on the encouragement of Kold Kristensen. In the 1951 the cooperation between Wegner, Kold Kristensen and the five Danish furniture makers was formalized and the company ‘Salesco’ –  an unique sales and marketing company that promoted Wegner’s work both in Denmark and abroad during the 1950s and 1960s. Salesco consisted of Carl Hansen & Søn, who produced chairs, Getama produced furniture pieces with cushions and beds, A.P. Stolen produced the upholstered furniture pieces, Ry-Møbler produced the shelves, carbines and the likes, while Andreas Tuck produced the tables.

With Salesco Wegner ensured that his all of his designs were produced at places where he could oversee and control the production. Salesco also began a comprehensive exhibition and advertisement activity targeted on end-consumers.

Even though Salesco played a very important part in capturing the internationally interest in Danish Design, and was a huge success, it did not last. Kold Kristensen let in order to work with the former apprentice of Wegner, young Poul Kjærholm, and in 1962 Holger Hansen died suddenly. Salesco ended during the 1960s.

The widow of Holger Hansen continued Carl Hansen & Søn, and kept the company on family hand through tough times in the 1970s and 1980s with the help of dedicated staff. Her son, cabinetmaker Jørgen Gerner Hansen, took over management of the company in 1988 and invested in new machines. In the early 1990 a renewed interest in Danish furniture emerged and a a Japanese subsidiary was established in 1991. With this, Carl Hansen & Søn relaunched several retired Wegner designs and in 2002 Carl Hansen & Søn purchased one of the rivaling furniture makers, Tranekær Furniture.

By 2002. Jørgen’s brother, Knud Erik Hansen assumed leadership, and have since built a new modern factory from where Carl Hansen & Søn still produce design furniture. Knud Erik Hansen internationalized the organization, leading to an export boom. In 2011 and 2012 Carl Hansen & Søn bought the renowned Rud. Rasmussen’s as well as P.J. Furniture, and could now incorporate designs by Mogens Koch, Kaare Klint and Ole Wanscher in the portfolio. Carl Hansen & Søn is today the largest manufacturer of furniture designed by Hans J. Wegner.

Christian Christensens Møbelfabrik

Christian Christensens Møbelfabrik (furniture factory) was established in 1911 by the Danish joiner Christen Christensen, born in 1886 in Vamdup, North Jutland, Denmark.

In the beginning the small factory manufactured sets of dining rooms and later expanded to include other furniture pieces. One of the most famous furniture pieces from this producer is; the Model 310 chair by Erik Buch (ca. 1956/57 – we have seen a photo from the factory showing workers making the chair).

Dantoft Kunstartikler

Dantoft Kunstartikler was a Danish company, that had their heyday in the 1960s and 1970s.

Dantoft Kunstartikler designed wall sculptures in many different forms and shapes, some as with a shallow candle holder towards the bottom and some without candle holder. They were all made in black lacquered wrought iron, with carefully arranged glass pieces in different sizes, glued to the sculpture – so the light from a candle, or the surroundings would be reflected in the many colorful glass pieces – creating beautiful patterns of lights spot onto the surrounding wall.

Kingo Keramik

Kingo Keramik (Kingo Pottery) is a Danish pottery located on the Danish island, Fyn. Unfortunately we have not been able to find any further information about them, so if you have any information that could help us, please do feel free to share your knowledge with us.

The stamped is a handwritten KK. The pieces we have seen with the stamp KK have them same kind of colored glazing – a beautiful multi-colored glaze spreading from white over green to dark brown-gray with hints of the deep red from the clay.

Søholm Stentøj

Søholm or Søholm Stentøj (Soholm Stoneware) dates back to the first half of the 17th century and the Danish island, Bornholm, which is famous for its pottery and fine ceramics. Søholm was founded in 1835, in Rønne, Bornholm by Herman Sonne Wolffsen (1811-1887) and Edvard Christian Sonne, making it one of the oldest ceramic factories on Bornholm, until its closure in 1996.

The name, Søholm, originated from the factory where the two founders formerly were employed, a faience factory near Copenhagen, in 1828-1839 (leased in 1834).

By 1841, Herman Sonne Wolffsen took over solo. In the beginning, Soholm mainly designed and manufactured yellow domestic fajance ware. After Herman Sonne Wolffsen’s death in 1887, Hans Ancher Wolffsen took over Søholm.  Together with his brother, he ran the factory into the first decade of the 20th century, with designs inspired by the Art Nouveau style floating through Europe at that time.

In 1908, ceramic artist Carl Møller took over daily management of the factory and four years later, he bought Søholm Stentøj. In 1919, right after WW1 and the difficulties following the war, he had to sell the factory to a wholesaler from Copenhagen, but stayed on manager.

To secure jobs within the local district, the municipality of Rønne bought Søholm in 1928, as it employed 40 people at that time. To avoid unfair competition, a business partnership took over the factory in 1933, and the factory was renovated and modernized. Six years later in 1939, the Union of Ceramics workers bought Søholm. During WW2, the number of employees grew at Søholm, as the Union referred unemployed to Søholm. Thus many avoided being sent off to Germany. By 1945 Søholm employed 200 people.

In the 1930s to 1940s, Søholm produced dinnerware, utility items and pipes. Especially the pipes were a huge success at Søholm, produced during WW2, but unfortunately the factory was boomed in 1945. The pipes are today very rare and highly sought after by collectors.

In the mid-20th century, Søholm produced a huge range of stoneware with different designs and shapes. One of the more famous stoneware series today, is the Burgundia Series – an exquisite series of stoneware with black matte glaze and graphical patterns decoration in pastel colors (white, light blue and light yellow). The shapes were designed by Holm Sørensen, while the decorations were designed by Svend Aage Jensen. The series was produced in the 1950s to the late 1960s.

In the same period, the Danish ceramic artist, Einar Johansen was employed at Søholm. He designed and created a wide range of stoneware, where his “blue series” is highly sought after today among collectors.
Søholm had financial problems in the late 1970s to early 1980s, but avoided closure. However in 1996, the factory closed.

A variety of different ceramic artists worked at Soholm, including: Noomi Backhausen (worked at Søholm 1966-1996), Maria Phillippi, Einar Johansen (worked at Soholm 1958-1966), Nana Ditzel and Haico Nitzsche.

Søholm did not use backstamps or hallmarks in the early production. Some items from 1887-1908, were marked H. Wolffsen & Son. In the period 1910-1930, the stamp was a crown and a ship, however, most items were only marked Søholm. From the mid-20th century, many pieces were hand-signed with Søholm, Stentøj, Denmark, or simply just Søholm.